Scientific Program

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Ian James Martins

Edith Cowan University, School of Medicine, Australia

Keynote: Appetite control is involved in Immunotherapy with relevance to cardiovascular disease, NAFLD and Diabetes

Time : 9:30-10:00

Biography:

Dr. Ian Martins is an Editor/Reveiwer for Open Acess Pub/MDPI journals and various other international journals. Appointed as the Chief Editor for International Journal of Diabetes Research (2014-2018), Research and Reviews: Neuroscience (2016-2018) and Journal of Diabetes and Clinical Studies (2017-2018). Conferred with the RICHARD KUHN RESEARCH AWARD-2015 ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM. He is a BIT Member (BIT Congress. Inc) with an H-index of 43, (ResearchGate STATs (23), Mendeley STATS (20). He is now a Scientist for The Science Advisory Board (USA) and an Academic with Academia.edu. The total citations over the past 27 years of scientific research has accumulated to approx. 3300. ResearchGate’s analysis available on google, Tweet, Facebook, Lindekin under Ian James Martins’ name places publication Stats RG score higher than 96% of the international SCIENTISTS. Prestigious Recognition of Lifetime Membership by International Agency for Standards and Ratings as Fellow for Diabetes, Medical Science (Nutrition). Winner (World Academic Championship -2017) in Diabetes and Medical Science (Nutrition). Certificates of appreciation from various international conferences have been received in relation to anti-aging, health and disease. Keynote addresses at Innovate Pharma 2017, Innovate Neurology 2017, World Diabetes and Endocrinology Summit-2017 and Pharmacology and Ethnopharmacology 2016.

 

Abstract:

Appetite control with relevance to immunometabolism has become critical to the treatment of non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and diabetes (1,2). Anti-aging genes (3,4) and their connections to autoimmune disease and mitophagy now identify the anti-aging gene Sirtuin 1 (Sirt 1) to be defective with increased heat shock proteins (HSP) involved in autoimmune disease and mitophagy (5) connected to irreversible programmed cell death in global populations. Appetite control or food restriction is required to maintain the heat shock gene Sirt 1 (6,7) that regulates HSP, amyloid beta and nitric oxide metabolism that are connected to natural killer cell activity, mitophagy and autoimmune disease in diabetes. Nutritional regulation of Sirt 1 with relevance to antimicrobial activity in humans (8) has become important to immunotherapy and the clinical treatment of NAFLD and diabetes. Nutritional diets that contain Sirt 1 activators have become vital to immunotherapy research to maintain immunometabolism and prevent mitophagy. Science and medicine and its relevance to genomic medicine (9) needs to consider Sirt 1 gene expression with its relevance to accelerated immune reactions that trigger acute cardiovascular disease. Various factors need to be considered as the trigger for toxic immune reactions with relevance to the progression of cardiovascular disease, NAFLD and diabetes.

Keynote Forum

Ban-Hock Toh

Monash University,Australia

Keynote: Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hepatitis

Time : 10:00-10:30

Biography:

Graduated MBBS University of Singapore (1965), FRACP (1975), FRCPA (1975), PhD (1977) and DSc (1986) Monash University. Heads the Autoimmunity Laboratory, Centre for Inflammatory Diseases, Department of Medicine, Monash University Faculty of Medicine and the Diagnostic Immunology Laboratory of Australian Clinical Laboratories, Clayton, Victoria. He has held positions as Head, Department of Immunology, Monash University (1995-2005) and was Chief Examiner in Immunology for the FRCPA (1995-2000). He has published 272 peer-reviewed papers, and 21 book chapters.  He is currently engaged in studies directed towards understanding the immunopathology of atherosclerosis, based upon his extensive experience in the immunopathology of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anaemia, autoimmune hepatitis and the molecular biology of early endosomes.

Abstract:

Autoimmune hepatitis is a rare disease of low prevalence that is associated with diagnostic autoantibodies.  These autoantibodies are useful disease markers that facilitate the early diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis for therapeutic intervention to prevent progression to liver cirrhosis and associated complications. Adult onset type 1 autoimmune hepatitis is associated with F-actin reactive smooth muscle SMA-T or SMA-G autoantibody, antinuclear autoantibody in 60% of patients, and autoantibody to SLA/LP in 15-20%. Juvenile onset type 2 autoimmune hepatitis is associated with LKM-1 and LC-1 autoantibodies. Liver autoantibodies in asymptomatic patients with normal liver function may precede the subsequent development of overt autoimmune liver disease. For routine diagnostic immunology laboratories, initial screening for smooth muscle SMA-T antibody by immunofluorescence remains the method of choice with confirmation for reactivity with F-actin by immunofluorescence.

 

  • Immuno Genetics and Immuno Genomics

Chair

Davood Jafari

Tehran University of MedicalSciences, Iran

Biography:

Abstract:

Background/aim: After allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), donor natural killer (NK) cells trigger alloreactions against potential recipient cells by their killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). This study investigated whether KIR/HLA genotypes and KIR haplotypes of donor and recipient exhibit a critical function in the prevalence of acute graft versus host disease aGVHD and persistence of the graft after HLA-identical sibling allo-HSCT for patients with hematological malignancies.

Materials and methods: We studied KIR and HLA genotypes in 115 relative donors and recipients (56 patients with AML and 59 patients with ALL) who had received allo-HSCT from HLA-matched sibling donors. We evaluated 17 KIR genes and some alleles, including their ligands using PCR-SSP assay.

Results: KIR gene frequency results between D/R showed that donors had more activating KIR than their recipients. Chi-square comparison of KIR Genotype frequencies in donors versus recipients revealed a significant difference (P<0.001). We found a survival association between the donor lacking and the recipient having group B KIR haplotypes, although the data was not statistically significant.

Conclusion: This study suggests that we could exploit NK cell alloreactivity as a part of the optimization of donor selection and potential immunotherapeutic regimens to help facilitate good engraftment, and reduce the risk of aGVHD incidence after allo-HSCT.

Keywords: KIR; HLA; allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; graft-versus-host disease

  • Immune responses

Chair

Laila Damanhouri

King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia

Session Introduction

Laila Damanhouri

King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia

Title: Role of T-cell in Bronchial Asthmatic
Biography:

Abstract:

Background: Bronchial asthma is an inflammatory airway disease characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells into bronchial tree and increased airway hyper-reactivity to various physical and chemical stimuli.
T-cells play an important role in pathogenesis and inflammatory immune response in bronchial asthma.
The aim of this study was to detect soluble interleukin-2 receptors (sIL-2) serum levels, as marker of T lymphocyte activation in vivo, among bronchial asthmatic children.
Methods: The study was done at King Abdulaziz University Hospital from January 2015 to December 2015. 77 children were included and subdivided into three groups (acute asthmatic; chronic stable asthmatic and control (table 1, demographic data). After History and clinical examination, with acute asthma were classified into atopic and non-atopic groups. Blood sample was taken from all groups and sIL-2R was measured by ELISA technique .

  • Clinical Immunology

Chair

Harshit Singh

Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, India

Session Introduction

Harshit Singh

Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, India

Title: Neutrophilic CD64 Expression differentiates between infection versus disease activity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients
Biography:

Abstract:

Purpose: Fever in case of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) may be due to disease activity or infection. As of now no biomarker can distinguish fever caused by disease activity or infection. We aimed to determine usefulness of CD64 glycoprotein expression on the surface of neutrophils in distinguishing bacterial infection from disease flare in SLE.

Methods: In this cross sectional, observational study 25 healthy control and 42 adult patients diagnosed of SLE were recruited. Neutrophil CD64 expression was measured by flow cytometry. Total Leucocyte Count (TLC), Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and anti-double stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) titers were noted. Diagnosis of bacterial infection was documented and appropriateness of first hand antibiotic treatment was established post hoc.

Results: Among 42 adult patients included 17(40.48%) were diagnosed with infection. Percentage of neutrophil with CD64 expression and their mean fluorescence intensity in patients with infection (75.52±12.79, 335.97±96.72 p<0.05) were significantly higher as compared to those without infection (9.65±4.69, 149.94±37.72 p<0.001). CD64 expression identified fever with asensitivity of82.81% and specificity of 82.87%.TLC (15912±8509, 6178±4023) and CRP (11.9±9.1, 1.3±1.8) were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients with bacterial infection than disease activity, while ESR (78±45, 62±42) and anti-dsDNA levels (145.9±146.4, 219.8±119.5) were non significant.

Conclusion: CD64 expression on neutrophils is helpful marker for early diagnosis of fever in SLE patients.

  • Vaccinology

Chair

E.Diane Williamson

University of Strathclyde, UK

Session Introduction

E.Diane Williamson

University of Strathclyde, UK

Title: Exploring Immunity, Inflammation & Infection
Biography:

Abstract:

This presentation will cover novel approaches to vaccination, which have been specifically designed to curtail disease outbreaks in resource poor settings.  A dual route vaccination approach will be described, in which a priming dose will be administered by sub-cutaneous injection by a health professional, whilst a booster dose is incorporated in an enteric coated -capsule for oral self-administration.   This approach to vaccination will be exemplified by data gained from an experimental model of Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)  and  will include considerations of vaccine antigen production and characterisation, the development of vaccine formulations, characterisation of the immune responses induced  and identification of the immune correlates of protection. This approach is adaptable to other pathogens which have potential for epidemic spread and to exemplify the generic nature of this approach, the data gained with a bacterial pathogen will also be mentioned.The preclinical development of this approach to vaccination will be described with an indication of the route to clinical development and expected clinical presentation.

Biography:

Abstract:

Background
Lagos rabies virus belongs to lyssavirus genus responsible for meningoencephalomyelitis in mammals that affect millions of people around the world and causes thousands of human deaths every year, to the best of our knowledge there is no peptide vaccine designed for Lagos rabies virus. The resulting peptide vaccine is expected to be more immunogenic and less allergic than conventional biochemical vaccines. The aim of this study was to design an Insilco peptide vaccine for Lagos rabies virus using Immunoinformatic tools.


Methods and Materials
Sequences of glycoprotein G of Lagos rabies virus was retrieved from NCBI, the retrieved sequences were then treated using different Immunoinformatic tools for B cell to find out the most conserved, surface and antigenic epitopes, and for T cell to find conserved peptides and to test their binding affinity to different MHC1 and MHC11 alleles. Then population coverage analysis and homology modeling was performed for most promising epitopes to show their structural positions in glycoprotein G.


Results and Conclusions
B cell tests were conducted for Bepipred with 22 conserved epitopes, Emini surface accessibility prediction with 12 conserved surface epitopes and Kolaskar and Tongaonkar antigenicity test with only three conserved epitopes being antigenic.
23 conserved epitopes were interacted with different MHC-1 alleles with (IC
50) ≤500 while 39 conserved epitopes interacted with MHC-II alleles with IC50≤ 1000.
Among all the tested epitopes for world population coverage the epitope FVGYVTTTF binding to both MHC1 and MHC11 alleles was 97.30% and it was found to bind 13 different alleles that indicate strong potential to formulate peptide vaccine for Lagos rabies virus.

Key Words
Immunoinformatic, Lagos Rabies Virus, Glycoprotein G, Lyssavirus, Peptide Vaccine, Epitope.

 

  • Immuno Proteomics

Chair

Leobardo Emmanuel Alvarez De Leon

Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Mexico

Biography:

Abstract:

Probiotics are live microorganisms, which administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Modulation of the immune response seems to be the common mechanism associated to the consumption of probiotics. Presumably, probiotics must establish a close relationship with dendritic cells (DCs), which are able to recognize microbial products by extending their dendrites to the intestinal lumen. Recent studies have shown that DCs activity can be modified following administration of probiotics, especially of the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium using in vitro methodology. In this sense, the analysis of the host-probiotic interaction represents a dynamic and complex process, which can be studied through tools based on the "omic" sciences. The aim of the present study is to analyze the expression of differential proteins of the interaction between probiotics isolated from breast milk and DCs using proteomics techniques, whereby DCs were generated from peripheral blood monocytes from four healthy participants and were co-cultured with probiotics of the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium previously isolated from breast milk. After 3 hours of co-cultivation under optimum conditions, the proteins were extracted from each culture, thus generating 2D proteomic maps (SDS –PAGE) and a differential proteomic expression was found derived from the interaction of the co-cultures compared to single cultures. To the moment, our results suggest that the activity of DCs can be successfully regulated by interaction with probiotics.
Key words: probiotics, breast milk, dendritic cells, proteomics.

  • Immunopathology

Chair

Meg Mangin

Chronic Illness Recovery, Fort Worth, TX, USA

Session Introduction

Meg Mangin

Chronic Illness Recovery, Fort Worth, TX, USA

Title: Inflammation and Vitamin D: the Infection Connection
Biography:

Meg Mangin, R.N. is the Executive Director of Chronic Illness Recovery. She has presented at many conferences, including Days of Molecular Medicine in Karolinska, the International Conference on Autoimmunity in Porto, Portugal, the American Society of Hypertension Meeting, Enabling Future Pharma, Perspectives in Rheumatic Diseases, Immunology Summit, International Lyme Society, American Association of Family Practitioners and the 18th Vitamin D Workshop. She is the co-author of a chapter in the textbook Vitamin D: New Research and the lead author of the ground-breaking review article Inflammation and vitamin D: the infection connection published in the October 2014 issue of Inflammation Research.

Abstract:

Inflammation is believed to be a contributing factor in many chronic diseases. The influence of vitamin D deficiency on inflammation is being explored but studies have not demonstrated a causative effect. Low serum 25(OH)D is also found in healthy persons exposed to adequate sunlight. Despite increased vitamin D supplementation inflammatory diseases are increasing. The current method of determining vitamin D status may be at fault. The level of 25(OH)D doesn’t always reflect the level of 1,25(OH)2D. Assessment of both metabolites often reveals elevated 1,25(OH)2D, indicating abnormal vitamin D endocrine function. Some authorities now believe that low 25(OH)D is a consequence of chronic inflammation rather than the cause. Research points to a bacterial etiology pathogenesis for an inflammatory disease process which results in high 1,25(OH)2D and low 25(OH)D. Immunotherapy, directed at eradicating persistent intracellular pathogens, corrects dysregulated vitamin D metabolism and resolves inflammatory symptoms. This article reviews vitamin D’s influence on the immune system, examines the myths regarding vitamin D photosynthesis, discusses ways to accurately assess vitamin D status, describes the risks of supplementation, explains the effect of persistent infection on vitamin D metabolism and presents a novel immunotherapy which provides evidence of an infection connection to inflammation.

  • Cancer and Tumor Oncology

Chair

Yuh-Ching Twu

National Yang-Ming University, Taiwan

Session Introduction

Yuh-Ching Twu

National Yang-Ming University, Taiwan

Title: The Effect of Surface Glycans on leukemia Susceptibility to NK-mediated Cytotoxicity
Biography:

Abstract:

The aberrant glycosylation on proteins and lipids has been implicated in malignant transformations through promoting the tumorigenesis, metastasis, and the evasion from the host immunity.  The I-branching β-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, responsible for the straight i conversion to branched I histo-blood group antigens, has been reported for its important effects on the migration, invasion, and metastasis of solid tumors.  First, we demonstrated that SHP-2-ERK2 signaling regulates the phosphorylation status of C/EBPa toby altering its binding affinity onto the IGnTC promoter region, thereby activating the synthesis of cell-surface I antigen formation during erythropoiesis.  Second, we addressed how the branched I antigens on the leukemia impacted the host immuno-surveillance mediated by natural killer (NK) cells.  The levels of I antigen presented on leukemia cells showed a positive correlation with the susceptibility to NK-mediated lysis.  Third, by the conjugation assay, elevating the expression of the I antigens on the leukemia cells that can only display low level of cell surface I antigens greatly increased the sensitivity to NK cytotoxicity.  Our findings suggested that branched I of the leukemia cells not only is important for NK targeting but also could serve as a potentially evaluation maker for NK-cell based leukemia treatment. 

  • Young Research Forum

Chair

Aigul A. Safiullina

Kazan State Medical Academy, Russia

Biography:

Aigul A. Safiullina is a PhD student at Neurology, Reflexotherapy and Osteopathy sub-faculty at Kazan State Medical Academy – branch of Russian Medical Academy of Continuous Professional Education. She has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Background:Myofascial pain syndrome affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide resulting in higher medical costs due to limited treatment efficiency and the need for preventive measures. Pathognomonic symptoms in myofascial pain are highly sensitive local myofascial nodules in skeletal muscles.Despite numerous ongoing studies regarding etiopathogenesis and treatment of this disorder, it remains highly prevalent (up to 85% of population) pointing to further research.Different medical specialists try to unravel a secret of myofascial pain that confirms the necessity for multidisciplinary approach to this problem.

Given the integrative role of central nervous system, its plasticity as the important property enabling adaptive holistic host responses in health and disease, it appears reasonable to  examine relationship between clinical-electroneurophysiological mechanisms of myofascial pain syndrome in correlation with cytokine expression profile. There are only few publications on cytokine expression in myofascial pain. They mostly deal with serum and muscle tissue cytokine profiles in athletes performing long-term physical activities.

Aim: to examine clinical and electroneurophysiological patterns in dynamic correlation with cytokine responses in patients with myofascial pain to further delineate pathogenetically based complex treatments including methods of complementary medicine (various acupuncture techniques, osteopathy, hirudotherapy, etc.).

Materials and methods: Subjects of the study are 54 patients with myofascial pain syndrome (aged 18-55, 34 females, 20 males) and 25 healthy controls matched for age and gender. The informed consent was obtained from all participants. We conduct comprehensive clinical and electroneurophysiological examination combined with quantitative real-time PCR cytokine profile expression (IL-1β, IL-8, IL-4, IL-10) in core needle muscle biopsies taken from highly sensitive myofascial nodules. Subjects had received advanced treatment involving different methods of osteopathy, acupuncture, hirudotherapy, antihomotoxic preparations.

Results: There is an increase in expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-8 in untreated patients versus controls. Patients after treatment upregulate expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-10. Changes in cytokine expression correlate with biomarkers of brain polysynaptic reflex excitability.

Conclusions: Study of tissue cytokine expression in myofascial pain syndrome in correlation with regular clinical and neurophysiological biomarkers might serve for improving personalized diagnosis, choice of treatment modalities, prognosis and prevention.